Afghanistan: The government confirms that the final UK flight carrying civilians has left Kabul

According to the Ministry of Defense, the UK’s last rescue plane for people has departed Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan. He was also said that UK political and military officials will be on board future flights.

General Sir Nick Carter, the director of the military services, said it was “heartbreaking” that they had not been possible to save everyone. Hundreds of Afghans who were eligible to travel to the UK stayed in Afghanistan, according to him.

Since the Taliban took control of the city, a massive evacuation has been undertaken, with a deadline of August 31 for international forces to exit the country. United States has been in control of the airport in Kabul, where a terrorist group murdered at least 170 people on Thursday, included two British citizens and a child of a British national.

Mohammad Niazi, a taxi driver from London, was one of those died in the war. He had gone to Afghanistan to support his family in arriving the airport. It’s uncertain if he was one of the British nationals identified by the Foreign Office. Mr Niazi was murdered during in the shooting in the aftermath of the blast, according to his brother Abdul Hamid. His wife and two children, he stated, were still gone.

At the peak of the action, almost 1,000 British troops were deployed in Kabul, supporting in the handling of flights from the airport. Some have already left, while the remainder will leave this weekend. Sir Laurie Bristow, the British embassy to Afghanistan, tweeted that approximately 15,000 people had been rescued, but that it was the time to finish this stage of the operation immediately.

He said, but we have not neglected about those who have yet to leave. We will keep do effort that we can to support them to recuse.

The escape has proceeded as well as it could in the conditions, but we have not been able to bring everyone out and that has been painful and there have been some extremely tough judgments that have had to be taken on the field, Sir Nick told Radio 4’s Today programme. He estimated that there were “hundreds” of Afghans who were qualified to travel to the UK but kept in Afghanistan.

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